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about this because his plan is to make great britain -- britain like greece. at the time when the economy is the key issue, he cannot talk about the economy because of his plans for tax cuts. this is what we see every week. he has a talk about the micro because he cannot talk about the macro. >> quarter. -- order, order. i asked you to reflect on what the public thinks of this sort of behavior. >> will the prime minister say that they will be turning over in their graves if they say the conservative sector doing this in england. >> my hon. friend has an extremely good. . i hope it is in order to talk about the record of labour in wales. what we see, if anyone wants to know what happened to the national health service, they can look over at wales, where they are slashing the budget and see more people waiting for a longer period that is what happens when the labor party is running the national health service. >> the leader of the opposition helped to create 300 more jobs, but because of his government and the reversal of policy, the renewable energy association says that the jo
about greece because his plan is to make britain like greece. [shouting] what the whole country would have noticed is at a time when the economy is the key issue he can't talk about the economy because of his ludicrous plan for tax cuts. that's what we see. week after week. he has to talk about the microbe because he can't talk about the macro. >> we are very grateful. >> order, order. order, order. order. i appeal to the house to calm down and reflect on what republic thinks. >> with the prime minister -- [inaudible] spirit by honorable fred has been an extremely good point and i hope it's an order, mr. speaker, to talk about labour's record in wales. because that is a torture talk about labour's record in wales because what we're seeing if anybody wants to know, what would happen to the nhs under labour, they can look at wales where they are flushing the nhs budget and they are seeing more people waiting for longer that is what happens when you have a labour party running the nhs. >> the leader of the opposition helped create 300 more jobs earlier this year. but today because of his
of other countries and britain had to take on some of that and do it directly and do it very well. the town itself is going to be one of the first places in afghanistan to transition. is imminent already today that security is provided by afghans for afghans. having been there many times, i find that fact pretty staggering and encouraging and you should too. >> given that the raw material, high proportion of illegal drugs on britain streets starts in afghanistan at progress is being made in getting farmers to grow other things other than poppy and is the prime minister confident the afghan government will continue this work once we left? >> we are seeing progress on this. britain is invested in the wheat seed distribution project. one of the lessons of going to e country repeatedly in the last five years is if you want to doomething about poppy cultivation you can talk all you like about destroying crops. the real key is building roads because you have got to enable the afghans to get their produce toarket. if they don't have legitimate produce to get to legitimate market the drug dealers w
. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning that portugal's debt has been downgraded to junk status. does he not agreed that you can't put off difficult de
.k. this is a good investment for britain and british taxpayers. >> can you explain whether the cost of this reform is set to rise even further? it is even higher. mib partly responsible for the health services. >> well we have actually seen as more and into thousand more doctors. he would see the number going down. it is going in. >> is the prime minister aware? does he not agreed that you cannot put off difficult decisions? >> plan b stands for bankruptcy. we can see what happens if government does not get a grip. that is what this governor is doing. >> says the price minister agree with you. will the prime minister support this sex it is the maximum sentence. >> it is not just because the constituent case. it is death by dangerous driving. someone was really damaged permanently. we are looking at this issue. we hope to make this progress. we will not be a global player. do you agree that it needs reminding? >> it is not what to do it the first question. it is disorderly. >> it was remarkable yesterday. it is involved with the imf. they are getting through. there is details. it should be made pub
of britain, outraged by the betrayal of trust by parts of our newspaper industry, who have spoken out up and down this country, who have contacted members across this house and told us of their concerns. the will of parliament was clear. the will of the public was clear. and now, britain's most powerful media owner has had to bend to that will. this debate is an opportunity to understand how we got here and where we go from here. i will speak briefly to allow others to speak in what has been curtailed debate. the terrible revelations of the last week have shaken us all. they have caused immense pain and heartache to reap families, as they learned their most private moments were stolen from them to sell newspapers. as each day has gone by, i am sure all of us will have felt the same. surely it cannot get any worse than this. but it has. the bone of milly dowler -- phone of milly dowler, the victims of 7/7, the families of our war dead, and the personal details of our former prime minister. and we are told there is worse to come. these revelations have uncovered a pattern of sustained crim
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
it at 2.5% of the cost. this is a good investment for britain, for british taxpayers to make sure we reduce inequality in our world. >> can the prime minister explain whether he thinks that the cost of his nhs reforms set to rise even further we now know with the revelation that a new super quango is going to be created. it might be partly responsible putting at risk services at the popular school in my constituency? >> what we've actually seen since this government has taken office is more than 2,000 more doctors but 4,000 fewer managers. and we are cutting bureaucracy by a third. i know they don't like to hear it. but if we'd followed their plans and cut nhs spending, you'd see the number of doctors, the number of nurses, the number of operations going down. and just this morning, we see the figures for the number of diagnostic tests in the u.k. going up. that's because of the investment going in under this government. >> thank you, mr. speaker. will the prime minister be aware of the news this morning that portugal's debt has been downgraded to junk status. does he not agreed that
to bailing out greece. >> britain is not in the euro. while i am prime minister, it will never be. we should not be involved in the euro areas internal arrangements. only euro countries were involved in the first bailout. only eurozone countries have been in the discussion about further bailout. it is right not to use the e.u.- wide financial stability mechanism for future aid to greece. >> the worst outcome for the british economy from the greek crisis would be a disorderly and chaotic the of fault -- default and departure from the euro. what discussions have we had about preparing for that default which is inevitable? the president himself has said that it does not need to be disorderly to dissolve the without the currency's much destruction. >> what is causing disorder and the fact they're going bankrupt. nothing said in this chamber will alter that. if greece can neither withdraw or default, then good money via our money or the imf will be wasted bailing out greece. why not leave an orderly withdrawal of greece from the euro? >> is it time to dispose of these things? checks seem to have
in arizona. hello. caller: i can see this going on in great britain, i guess the police are involved. but then they are doing it for us in the same manner. scanning e-mails, looking for certain words and what ever. i do not see any difference. i mean, they are exchanging information, but the fact that the government is concerned in one place and not the other is somewhat humorous or dreadful, depending on your point of view. host: thank you for calling the idea this morning. a bit more from the can paulson editorial this morning. every news organization host: next call on the british phone hacking scandal and its impact comes from denver. hello. caller: i'd think it has been going on for a long time in america. the sponsors, rep john de gaulle, michigan, and republicans worked together with the chamber of commerce to defeat it in 1997. him and reagan had health plans to take $1,900,000 in total compensation and resigned. his three underlings took almost 1100 million dollars. host: tie this into what we are talking about. caller: i think that this is going on for a long time. where do
on with doing things that britain should be doing in the world. whether that is trading with countries like nigeria or leading the aid effort in the horn of africa where we had been told is not just catastrophe, it is also a famine. >> mr. speaker, yesterday rupert murdoch was asked about his secret meetings with the prime minister and his government. he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. >> one of the outcomes is that there will be a lot more of leave everybody alone. >> in the investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personnel information transactions which were possibly identified as coming from 89 newspaper journalists. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the unlawful practices going on at mirror group newspapers? >> i think the gentleman makes an important point. what we should not believe automatically that these practices were spread right across the media, it would be naive to think they were restricted to one newspaper or one newspaper group. when you look at evidence, it is clear that they went wider.
to help strengthen their country and keep britains and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more, including many civilians, have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they've been part of an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific u.n. mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many, many difficult times, we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor as prime minister told this house that some 3/4 of the most serious terrorist plots against britain had been links to afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard but i say this figure is now significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and their former host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence sugg
to show you their coverage. caller: i appreciate that. it exposes us to what is going on in britain, which i think affects us here. we have rupert murdoch controls news of but -- "news of the world," and he controls "wall street journal." it seems to me since he took over "wall street journal," it has kind of slanted, not doing the reporting that it used to do. the other issue i wanted to bring up and i'm wondering if down the road you can do the programming on it, i read that eric cantor in his investment portfolio is betting against the dollar. i don't understand, if you could do research and have somebody do a program about that. if the second highest ranking person in the house, how could you be betting against the dollar in your investment portfolio? i know his wife works for bank of america. but this is crazy. if you guys can look into that and maybe do a program -- and on the 14th amendment, and maybe invite someone to explain to us how the 14th amendment and the 11th amendment, so we can -- mostly i get my information from c-span and if you guys could go back to giving us informati
, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before we end the rebuttal portion of this debate, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a century of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so the issue is whether it is possible to
today. in fact, the level of economic interdependence between britain and germany was such that it was in some ways madness these two countries went to war. there was a very famous book written by a young historian who talked about the fact that perhaps britain should not have gone to war. that this was craziness for britain to do it and it was the pity of war. wait a minute. that historian was niall ferguson. >> yes, before wend the rebuttal portion of this deba, i'd like to allow dr. kissinger the last word. >> i don't know whether one can reverse the order of participants up here, because i think it's three to one against my friend niall. our chinese friend is saying that china has suffered a great deal, has been provoked through a ntury of western exploitations and that it's not trying to dominate the world. as i understand what he is saying it is this -- when the west wants to discuss climate or the financial assistance, our tendency is to say china can be a stakeholder. it can be a participant in a system they did not themselves participate in creating. so th
? >> britain is not in the euro and while i am prime minister, it will never be in the euro so we should not be involved in those internal arrangements. only eurozone countries were involved. only eurozone countries have been involved about further bailouts. it is right not to use the european financial stability mechanism for future support to greece. >> what discussions did he have about preparing for that the fault? in particular with the president who has said in the context of departure from the euro and the devolution of the monetary union, it does not have to be disorderly. >> what is causing disorder as instability in europe. it is the fact that cannot be changed. if greece can default. good money will be wasted failure of greece. why wasn't the prime minister your normal skeptical self and lead an orderly withdrawal? >> checks seem to be a it endangers species sincethey were in terminal decline. the council said there is no alternative. the council did not look too happy when they came before the treasury committee. >> it is a imperative as working to have a viable set of of tre
of the issue, how the actual order was britain that prevented the fcc from publishing that order, those rules, threw out right away. that allow for further review. it has created a lot of uncertainty. under the president's executive order for agencies to reduce the amount of unneeded regulations, i think this should be first on the list. >> i cannot believe i am going to say these words, but let's stop right universal service reform. what is the status of this? this was broadband before it came out and there was some speculation by the chairman's office that it would be out before the leaves changed in the trees. now they say that will not happen and it is in the final stretch. what is going on? >> it could be the leaves this fall. the universal service is in a dollar billion per year subsidy program -- is an eight to dollar billion per year subsidy program that services a low- income, schools, libraries, a big umbrella. i have been pushing for reform for many years and we have come very close to resolving many issues on universal service in related areas about carrier compensation, exchangin
we take c-span on the road. britain and our resources to your community. it is washington, 8 -- bringing our resources to your community. it is washington, your way. >> next, q &a. after that, the c-span documentary, "the library of congress." >> this week on q&a, erik larsen, best-selling author of the devil and the white city and thunderstruck. he discusses his latest book in the garden of beasts. it is a historical narrative following a family of america's first ambassador to enough fillers third reich. >> erik larsen, author of "in the garden of peace," i want to get your immediate reaction -- in the garden of beasts," i want to get your immediate reaction. >> that is hitler in one of his historic speeches. why is it in your book? >> i have very few photographs. we can talk about why. but i have that in a particular place in the book because it signals what is coming next. the madness is intensifying. >> would do learn about mr. hitler that you did not know before you started writing your book? >> id is not so much -- well, i learned that his favorite movie was "king kong
. in a conversation what britain's prime minister, david cameron. this "q&a" week aren't a new book by scott miller. it tells the story of life in america. president william mckinley was shot by an assassin leon czolgosz. >> why did he decide to do a book on the assassination of william mckinley? >> i have been interested in this timeframe in the 18 eighties and the 1890's. it is a fascinating and important turning point. before then, you had a united states that would be recognized by the founding fathers. by the turn of the century, it is the america we would know it today. it is a tremendous patriotism in this time. it is very romantic. you look through american society and to see it. we think of the tycoons. it was a proliferation of new products. you'd be hard-pressed to go to a grocery store where you did not see projects came from this. ivory soap, pillsbury dough. the art really reflected this as well. john philip sousa was writing this. who was leon czolgosz? did he use a different name? >> he was the assassin. he had worked in a steel factory. he worked in the cleveland area. did the econ
with great respect for all of you, for parliament, and for all of the people of britain, whom you represent. this is the most mumble day of my career. after all that has happened, i know that we needed to be here today. james and i would like to say how sorry we are for what has happened, especially with regard to listening to the voicemale of victims of crime. my company has 52,000 employees. i have led it for 57 years, and i have made my share of mistakes. i have lived in many countries, employed thousands of honest and hard-working journalists. i own nearly 200 newspapers of very different sizes, and i have followed countless stories about people and families around the world. at no time do i remember being as sickened as when i heard what the dowler family had to endure, which i think was last monday week. nor do i recall being as angry as when i was told that the news of the world could have compounded their distress. i want to thank the dowlers for graciously giving me the opportunity to apologize in person. i would like all the victims of phone hacking to know how completely and deep
reigning in the indefensible and criminal on occasion behavior of some members of the press in britain and i think this is true around the world. so retaining the freedoms which are not enshrined in the british institution in the way they are in the american institution. host: here is prime minister camera address and what will be looked into when it comes to how the media does its business. >> i think the problem here is that is not a paper about the practices. what needs to change is not the name of the newspaper, the title come or the letter had. what needs to change are the practices that go on and make sure they are all legal and properly managed. that is the challenge. it is not for me to say what papers remain open and close, but it is for me to set up the processes, these inquiries to make sure we learn lessons in these things did not happen again. host: mr. edgecliffe-johnson, anything you'd like to add to that? guest: he said that it is important for the media to be able to speak truth to power, but it is also important for those in power to feel like they can seek truth in t
were yet available. more on the phone hacking in britain, david cameron is cutting short an african trip and ordering a special parliamentary session, extending the session on the start of a scheduled summer recess for emergency meeting on wednesday. this following the resignation of britain's top police officer and the rest of rebekah brooks, the former ceo of rupert murdoch's news international. mr. murdoch, his son james and ms. brooks are set to testify before a parliamentary inquiry tomorrow. you can hear it live at 9:30 a.m. eastern here on c-span radio. those are some of the latest headlines. >> had ever visited the library of congress? over 2 million people have and now this is your chance to tour the world's largest library. tonight, join c-span for a rare glimpse inside the library of congress. we will take you into the great hall and explore the main reading room. unique books and rare books and special collections including original books from thomas jefferson's personal collection. but we will see how the library is using modern technology to discover hidden secrets and
. is britain's police force incompetent or corrupt or both? public confidence in the police is said to be rocky after two high-profile resignations. the police said manning a botched investigation -- admitting a botched investigation, and now an admission that they were working at "news of the world" at the same time. so how far can we trust the yard? >> in this wine bar, just a stunt drove from scotland yard. they were on drinking terms. the latest revelations in this fast-moving story showed that the connection went deeper than s. -- than this. journalists always are looking for information. that is part of the job. in told by a former senior policemen, that and in this bar in the west and, these to be regular meetings between "news of the world" journalists and the head of the media to discuss fraud. i am told that the relationship was incredibly close. former commissioner met with "news of the world" 14 times in two years. >> was there any element of the relationship between the police and "news of the world" that is impeded them from pursuing the fund had been inquiry? that is the question
, male gland voters -- male land owners. only a loan -- the nobility and great britain had a voice in parliament. and the democracy that have gone on in great britain largely from our example. so that they have representative government in bright -- great mac britain announces such an extent that the house of lords has almost no sway at all. that is learning from their american cousins. host: let us get a response from our guest, karlyn bowman. guest: america has been a beacon to the world and so many ways. americans, when they are asked about democracy promotion, that are skeptical that -- that we know enough to do it a broad and skeptical of the result but certainly they believe the world would be a safer and better place if there were more democracies. i did the caller is also correct that the military, as he said, is very differently regarded ban after vietnam. somebody like david petreaus is one of the most popular people in american life. i think that speaks to the kind of sacrifices he has main, that all those people in the military are making. host: yet those in congress gr
power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people wl lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the fit thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a big meeting in atlanta. a national group was
the other free pensioner benefits and i believe were doing fair by britain's pensioners. >> thank you, mr. speaker. the prime minister -- [inaudible] there's a contrast. does he agree with me that we should be in the vanguard of reform in our own pension so we can look at at our constituents in the face of? >> know, i absolutely agree with you honorable lady in this house. we are public sector workers as well. we should be subject to exactly the same changes we are asking others to take on. so the increase in contribution should apply to the mp system even though it's a system where we already made him quite a lot. we are saying right across the board the increase in pension >> age week the house of commons is in session, we air prime minister's questions. again on sunday night at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. watch any time at c-span.org where you can find video of other british public affairs programs. next, journalist david actxs reports on u.s. troops in southern afghanistan. then, representative thaddeus mccotter announces his candidacy for president. >> tune in to c-span this indep
will it be, as far as i know. the scandal unfolding in great britain right now is interesting. it is upsetting to the extent that people had their personal voice mails listened to end in some cases the leaded. that is over the top. on the other hand, i have to say that a lot of the outrage seems politically motivated. virtually everyone in the press is liberal and they hate him because he is conservative. he is also resented for taking over a lot of companies. i would say that the violations of privacy that apparently took place, as a libertarian i am upset by that, pale in comparison to the ones that take place every day conducted by the u.s. government. who can look into your e-mail, telephone conversations, checking accounts, and no one says anything about it because it is done under the federal rubric of the war on terror. the rest of us sit by and allow it. we should not. if you are offended by what happens in great britain, you ought to be every bit or more offended by your government, which you are paying for, against your will in some cases, is doing the same thing. ho
not want to cancel my visit to africa. it is important that we get on with doing things that britain should be doing in the world. whether that is trading with countries like nigeria or leading the aid effort in the horn of africa and were we had been told is not the catastrophe, it is also a famine. >> mr. speaker, yesterday' rupet murdoch was asked about his secret meetings with the prime minister and his government. he replied, i wish they would leave me alone. >> one of the outcomes is that there will be a lot more of leave everybody alone. >> in the investigation, the information commissioner found 861 personnel information transactions which were possibly identified as coming from 89 newspaper did analyst. can the prime minister confirm that the inquiry that he has announced will be able to look into the on law practice is going on at mirror group newspapers? >> i think the gentleman makes an important point. what we should not believe automatically that these practices were spread right across the media, it would be naive to think they were restricted to one newspaper or one newspape
on the specifications of the machines bank in london, rupert murdoch has arrived at britain's parliament ahead of his appearance before lawmakers. he will be questioned about the investigation that brought down the newspaper. his son and rebekah brooks are also expected to appear. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> the c-span network -- we provide coverage of politics, public affairs, nonfiction books, and american history. it is all available to you. find our content any time throughout c-span's video library. bringing our resources to your community. is washington, -- it is washington, your way. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your chance to talk to the new york times best selling author and syndicated columnist. three hours, starting at noon eastern on c-span2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: karen bass, a democrat, representing california's 33rd district. good morning. talk to us about the cut, cap & balance vote today in the house. do you think any democrats will vote for it? guest: frankly, i think it is very, very bad policy. some of the
in britain, the prime minister says that the tabloids and phone hacking scandal has created a once in a generation chance to clean a murky relations between media, police and politicians. he also defended his private discussions with executives. meanwhile, also in britain today a group of computer hackers who call themselves anonymous claimed to have breached nato security and access to restricted material. they say it would be irresponsible to publish most of the material, but that is sitting on about 1 gigabyte of data. they have posted a document that appears to be restricted from nato. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> it takes a behind this? look says broadcast and cable. the l.a. times calls the required to be beating. it solves mysteries that even nicolas cage can't contour. the original documentary c-span on sunday night at 9:00 eastern. the supreme court is now available as an enhancer e-book. -- enhanced e-book. this includes an interview with the newest supreme court justice. add to your experience by watching multimedia clips. available now or e
-war britain yts. and a professor looks at the issues of civil rights in the early 199 's. get the complete weekend schedule at c-span.org/history. this weekend on c-span -- live from salt lake city, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11, and the featured speaker, thomas friedman, talks competitiveness and the economy. look for live coverage saturday at 5:30 eastern and sunday at 1:30 eastern. the national governors association, this weekend online on c-span radio and on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: on your screen is congressman john carter, republicans of texas, and as i mentioned before the break, he is a member of the house appropriations committee and also serves as secretary leadership position to the republican conference in the house. well, there's a headline, congressman, on politico, panicky hill scramble for deal. are you feeling a sense of panic about the situation? guest: there's a lot of tension. you can't deny the tension that is everywhere. a lot of the debate is taking place behind closed doors. many people are wondering what's going on. they
mcconnell talk about the ongoing debt ceiling negotiations. earlier, britain and obama nominated richard carter dougherty to head the bureau launching this week. he served as ohio's attorney general in the past. the nominee has to be approved by the senate. from the rose garden at the white house, this is just under 10 minutes. pff>> good afternoon, everybody. it has been almost three years since the financial crisis pulled the economy into a deep recession. and millions of families are still hurting because of it. they're trying to get by on one income instead of two, on fewer shifts at the plant or at the hospital. they're cutting expenses, giving up on a family night out so there's money for groceries. and for a lot of families, things were tough even before the recession. so we've got to get the economy growing faster and make sure that small businesses can hire again, so that an entrepreneur out there can sell a new product, so that the middle class is getting stronger again, and so folks feel confident in their futures and their children's futures. that's why we can't let politics
to 9000. britain has the second-largest contingent emerson no rigid military personnel in the country behind the united states. his announcement follows president obama's decision to reduce american troops but 33,000 by the end of next summer. meanwhile, in afghanistan a charter plane chartered by the u.s. military has crashed into a mountain top. no americans were aboard the plane according to a spokesperson for the u.s. transportation command. we will hear more in afghanistan from general david read this. you can hear this later on c- span radio. nbc reports that mitt romney raise over $18 million in the second quarter, the amount larger than any other gop candidates. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> c-span has launched a new easy to navigate web site for politics in the 2012 presidential campaign. links to c-span media partners in the early primary caucus states. visit us at c-span.org/campaign 2012. >> the supreme court is now available as a standard and enhanced ebook. 11 original c-span interviews with current and retired justices. this new edition incl
elaborate on that? >> in great britain they undertook of reform. they had a white paper and a study on what they should do. they concluded it would be useful to increase private savings at the same times so security reform. it actually increased benefits and the public system. but they decided that that was not enough. it was indexed at a lower rate. to really help people, we really needed to build the private pension savings. if you look at the private pension system, it covers fairly poorly most of the population. i have not quite updated it, but it says that for 75% of people that retire, social security and medicare is in excess of all of their private assets. we have a larger extent of the population dependent upon social security and medicare. how do we deal with it? one way we do what it is be -- we tried to increase some of those cash benefits for lower and moderate income people. from the middle-income people, i do not think we can get thereby adding to a system that is out of balance. we need to recognize that private retirement system is not doing a good job of covering the vast
, britain, and if you constitutional monarchies in scandinavia, you have a rise of radicalism in continental europe through the depression and in hitler's germany, miscellany, and everywhere. when you have slow growth, you might think that everyone would say we should pitch in together and save the nation. it is not just here, but in both democracies. whenever these subgroups may become you want to hang on to what you have in a shrinking economy. it tends to over power politics and it is very frightening. >> there is the zero some mentality. do you want to add anything? >> it does not relate these days. we did not like one another when things were going good. that was because politics is not based on class groups but lifestyle groups. those sorts of relationships have broken. >> the lack of cohesion that i worry about is not a function of the economy as much as it is a function of demography. one might became a minority in the larger state of the union -- when whites became a minority, that forces us to recalculate what it means to be a member of a minority and what obligations and responsib
opposed to obamacare because i lived under national health in britain for three years and i know what happens. eu end up with a ration care. this last saturday on my program i had a nurse practitioner call in from arkansas who said that already they are being turned down for treatments. they request treatment and are being turned down under medicare because the person is terminal. since they are terminal, the treatment is not worth giving. they suffer and die. there is a woman going blind and that she cannot get treatment for her element that is causing her to go blind, because she is terminal. dr. berwick, put in a recess appointment ito be the head of medicare, is it in a love affair with the british system. they deny people 59.5 because it is not a good investment. even president obama said it was perhaps not the best use of resources to give his grandmother and a hip replacement after she was diagnosed with terminal ccer. i guess she could hobble around in panama she was dying of cancer. that is a -- not the kindh -- whilee around in pain b she was dying of cancer. that is not the
the government is ignoring is the fact that our power grid is ready to go down in 10 years or less. great britain is out one year or less. if that power system goes down, those systems you have built up will not be able to operate. people will lose food. stores will lose food. restaurants will lose food. this happened in world war ii when hitler was in power. they rationed power at 3 days a week. you could not keep food in your refrigerator to last. it is my understanding it would take $1 billion to correct this problem. think of the job creation it would create. guest: great point. there are probably a lot of projects like that to be addressed. the first thing is we have to get a pathway to balance. if we do not do that, we do not have money to do anything. your point is to have congress did into the issues, determine priorities. then let them determine the spending that needs to take place for long-term sustainability of our economy, services, and country. host: bruce cook, the tea party has increased your ideas. guest: we are bipartisan. tosuppaccept anyone who wants support this. i was at a b
we broadcast in britain. also where you can watch and read the broadcast. we are also live streaming on the internet for anyone to put on there website. the nation is live streaming us. free speech tv is broadcasting across the united states. people are using facebook and twitter with this broadcast. it is important because information is power. information as a matter of life and death. we have learned that through these remarkable documents that have been released in the last year. the iraq war locks, the afghanistan war logs, and cable- gate, the documents that are continuing to be released. why does that matter so much? we will talk about that this afternoon. let's take one example the came out of the iraq war logs. these logs show that two men were standing under an apache helicopter. the men have their hands up. they are attempting to surrender. the helicopter can see this. they are not a rogue. the soldiers called back to the base. they ask what to do. the lawyer says you cannot surrender to a helicopter. they blow the man away. that was february 2007. now we fast 4 to july 12
. taiwan. russia, hong kong. britain. twit ser land and luxembourg. our mountain of debt for the u.s. economy from the business section today. bert from spring borrow ohio. grand bargain. everything back on the table is now back on the front page of the "washington post" this morning? caller: i don't agree with them, with any of the way they're coming up with those ideas. either tax the wealthy or cut government programs. why do they need to do either or? you have a lot of government employees. we're the ones why can't you cut their hours like a regular business would do. these people get sick paid days and all kind of benefits. just cut some of their hours and let's get some of that revenue back going. what's wrong with working half day fridays and just start you know, saving some taxpayers some money? i don't understand it. i didn't vote for any of these people to make tough decisions. i voted for them to make smart decisions. host: thanks for the call. twitter page. the president put anything on the table. republicans are pushing american poor to the brink. crystal on the demo
falls through. but a publisher in britain says it was still expected to publish the book. coming up, we continue our discussion about the debt talks. president obama is meeting with congressional leadership today at the white house. we have a senator coming up, a republican from mississippi, senator roger wicker, but up next, one of the leaders in the house on the democratic side, xavier bacerra. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] >> who is really going to be going to get fired up over nancy pelosi or john boehner? they are proxies' or shorthands for the incredibly narrow range of choice that we have in an elected officials. >> in "the declaration of independents." reason deede's nick gillespie takes on the two-party system and possible libertarian solutions. sunday night on "q&a." >> this weekend on book tv on c- span2, is everything you know about the ok corral wrong? jeff guinn tells a different story. on "after words," charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the state system. and foreign min
, the library of congress held 3000 volumes. >> 1812, we went to war with great britain, and in august, 1814, british troops marched into washington and burned down the capitol building. >> jarvis and read about it in the newspapers and offered to sell his own book collection. >> it was a magnificent collection, and jefferson needed the money, but also jefferson was an eclectic collector. he believed -- read several foreign languages. he had a huge number of books that were poetry and english literature. was very flattering to congress to do this, but he was also saying, if you are going to govern this new country, you need to have a box on all subjects. that created some controversy. in the house there was debate whether the government needed books on a portrait. is this what we should be spending money on? >> part of it was opposition to jefferson himself. there were people who would just not vote for it because it came from jefferson. >> in the end, the house voted to buy jarvis and's library, 6487 volumes for just under $24,000. >> 187 become converts the the best thing it every did when
. there is much excellent journalism in britain today, but the way the press is regulated is not working. the press complaints commission has failed. in this case, it was pretty much absent. therefore, we have to conclude that it is ineffective and lacking in record. competing newspapers to judge each other. as a result, it lacks public confidence. i believe we need a new system entirely. lester in prison and is that it should be truly independent of the press so that the public will love the newspapers will no longer be solely responsible for policing themselves and independent of government. how politicians are not going to try to control the press. this new system of regulation must strike a balance between an individual's right to privacy and what is in the public interest. it should of pull the the proper decent standards. in the days ahead, we meet with the leader of the opposition to discuss exactly how they should be run. if we are going to discuss the way the press is regulated, it would be much better to do this on a cross party basis. people are also talking about their respec
of international prominence was after the war with great britain, people in the united states said we had been at war but we owe some people money. we're still going to pay its. they will still stand could for their debts. this is a country to watch. it is a country of integrity. that is what we still need to do. >> i will wrap this up. >> you joked about greece. are you truly worried that if it comes and goes there is no agreement that the global markets will not violently react to what the congress and the white house had refused to do? another global concern is the notion of a phone hacking. it has been happening a lot overseas. you have a reaction to that as well. but i'm just trying to watch that. >> this is a violent reaction. we had some smart people that have been in the business for a long time. i continually challenge them. how does this happen? play it out for me. i am yet to find anyone he can lay this out for me. -- who can lay this out for me. no one has the nerve to find out. i do not know. we can make sure that we maintain the full faith and credit of the united states so we do
new book, classified, secrecy in the state and post-war britain. and the professionor looks at civil rights in the early 1990s. get the complete schedule. >> live from sthracks, the nation's governors look at the lessons of 9/11 and freedman talks about competitiveness and the economy. the national governors association, this weekend, on line on c-span radio and on c-span. >> i'm very interested in what i call disappearing america. america that may not be here 25 years from now. >> for 30 years carol has traveled the united states documenting the country through her photo lens. follow her story. sunday night on quanchquanch. it's a prelude to the documentary, the library of congress. >> it's all available to you on t vision, radio, on line. and find our content any time through c-span's video library. and we take it on the road with our digital bus and local content vehicle. it's washington your way. the c-span networks. now available more than 100 million homes. provided as a public service. "washington journal" continues. host: we're joined by pedro of reuters. as you look at the u
in britain. and how the shutdown of the british tabloid news of the world affects of journalistic standards in the future. and we discussed the south korea free trade agreement and the details involved in that a pending deal. and your phone calls, and females, and more live on c- span. earlier today, british prime minister david cameron took questions from reporters on his government's response to that scandal by some journalists at a news of the world. he also commented on his decision to higher the man arrested earlier today on allegations of corruption and involvement when he was editor. the news conference from london is 45 minutes. >> in the morning, everyone, and thank you for coming. over the last few days, the whole country has been shocked by the revelations of the phone hacking scandal. murder victims, terrorist victims', families that lost loved ones who sometimes defending our country, that these people could have their funds have been two to yield stories for a newspaper is simply disgusting. i cannot think what was going to the minds of the people that did this. that they can
of international prominence was after the war with great britain, the war of 1812, people in the united states said, yeah, we have been at war, but we helped some bankers, we are still going to pay the money. they reassured the world even though there had been a war they are still going to stand good for their debts. and that's when people stood up and took notice and said that's a country to watch. a country of integrity. that's what we are -- still need to be. >> i'm going to do one more question and wrap it up. >> you mentioned, you joked about greece. are you truly worried that if august 2 comes and goes and there is no agreement, that the global markets will not violently react to what the congress and the white house have refused to do? and on the second question, another global concern, this is a very different issue, that senator rockefeller brought it last night, is this notion of phone hacking and what's happening a lot with news corporations overseas and whether or not there is a violation of u.s. law. do you have a reaction to that as well? >> i'm just starting to watch that scandal on
of our nation's $14 trillion debt. not only from china but from great britain, saudi arabia and other places as well. admiral mullen, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff have called the national can he tell the single biggest threat to our national security. and for the first time in modern history last year's congress passed no budget, no fundamental blueprint for federal spending and no final decision on spending levels through the appropriations process for the entire fiscal year. we've been operating under a series of continuing resolutions which has led to uncertainty as to federal levels of spending and as to tax rates which in turn has led to a lack of hiring in the private sector with an unemployment rate of 9.2% which in turn has led to less revenues in federal coffers, a vicious cycle that cannot continue. any agreement to president obama's request to increase our borrowing limit should include a real plan to bring our fiscal house in order and reduce the nation's unsustainably high levels of federal spending, of debt and deficits. this should include substantial reduc
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